Review: Song of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury (Sorrow #2)

Title: Song of Sorrow

Author: Melinda Salisbury

Pages: 370

Published: 7th March 2019

⭐️ 5 / 5

Anyone who has spoken to me over the last year will know just how much I loved State of Sorrow. It was easily my favourite book of 2018 so the sequel, and conclusion to the duopoly, Song of Sorrow is one of my most anticipated reads of this year. State of Sorrow ended on a cliffhanger that meant Sorrow’s struggles weren’t over, they were merely beginning and were sure to spiral out of control.

One thing I really enjoyed about the first book was all of the ‘supporting cast’, as I call them, which continues into book two. Sorrow has a fantastic support network of characters around her. Irris is honestly the dream best friend. She’s a no-nonsense, fantastic right hand woman. Rasmus has my heart, end of. He’s just such a gent and a class act through everything. Charon is a gem, Luvian is witty and hysterical and I love him, and Mael must be protected at all costs. They’re all just so human, including Sorrow, and I really cared about what happened to them all. However, Sorrow spends a large part of this book pushing all of these people away from her, in the mistaken belief that she is protecting them. Unfortunately, as this is a Melinda Salisbury novel, that doesn’t play out too well. It was emotionally painful to read. There may have been some shouting at the pages… Despite this, there were some truly hilarious moments in this book. There is no end to Melinda’s witty dialogue and the banter between the characters. By the end of the novel I even had a soft spot for Arkady. I love all of these characters so much and I will really miss them.

As I’ve come to expect from Melinda Salisbury, the plot is as twisty and turn-y as ever. There’s also the usual last-minute curveball when you think there can’t possibly be enough pages left to sort it out, which really panicked me as this novel is the concluding part of the series. The narrative was so intricately woven together with many different strands needing to come together before the final page, which I think was achieved brilliantly. We continued learning more about the world that even Sorrow herself was having to discover. I think this was particularly impressive as this book felt far more focused on Sorrow and her close circle than book one due to her isolated situation. Somehow, Vespus became even more despicable and evil during this, until he had a strangely human moment which caught me off guard and left me feeling mildly sorry for him. Honestly, the redemption arcs and glimmers of redemption in this series are ridiculous and I love them.

I cannot say enough about how much I enjoyed this whole series. I was really happy with how each of the characters’ stories wrapped up. The concluding sentences were some of the most beautiful I have ever read and it felt like a lovely goodbye to the characters and the readers. I cannot wait to see what Melinda Salisbury has up her sleeve for us next. In the meantime I’d really recommend this duology to anyone who needs a witty, wholesome series and to anyone who wants to think about the different forms of a family.

The thrilling conclusion to State of Sorrow by best-selling fantasy author Melinda Salisbury.
Sorrow Ventaxis has won the election, and in the process lost everything… Governing under the sinister control of Vespus Corrigan, and isolated from her friends, Sorrow must to find a way to free herself from his web and save her people.
But Vespus has no plans to let her go, and he isn’t the only enemy Sorrow faces as the curse of her name threatens to destroy her and everything she’s fought for.

FROM WATERSTONES – I AM NOT AFFILIATED WITH THIS, OR ANY OTHER, BOOKSHOP

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