I think I’m a Kindle convert

I know. I said it would never happen…

On Black Friday 2019 the Amazon sales broke me and I bought the new Kindle Paperwhite (not sponsored, it’s just the e-reader I purchased).

Back in 2016, during the huge rise in e-books, I wrote this blog post -> 3 Reasons Why I Will Always Be Loyal To Print Over e-Books. Yet it’s 2020 and I’ve eventually bought a Kindle. Dare I say, I’m actually pleasantly surprised and all of the factors that left me vehemently against these evil electronic book murdering machines, have been less of an issue than I expected.

It won’t feel like a ‘real’ book…!

Let me tell you, 900 pages of paperback feels every bit as long on a Kindle. For me, I think what helps with this is that my Kindle Paperwhite has a matte screen. It doesn’t look like a screen therefore it doesn’t feel like a screen when I’m reading. Yes I have the backlight option available for lowlight conditions but I very rarely use it which means there’s no glare on my eyes, aka like reading paper (thumbs up emoji).

I do miss turning the pages and feeling the physical book, however if I can read fanfiction on a screen (don’t judge) I can read a published book on a screen. I’m coming to realise that the ‘real book’ is the words and not necessarily the paper.

NO BOOK SMELL

Again, missing one of my favourite parts of a book but it’s not like I’ve donated my book shelves and removed them all from my life. My Kindle will always play second fiddle to a physical book but I don’t detest the e-book the way I expected to.

Convenience

The biggest realisation for me has been how convenient a Kindle is. I don’t mean that there is an entire library in my pocket, more that I have 24 hour access to new titles and the next book in a series. The new Paperwhite also has the option to add audible narration for a relatively small extra cost (this may not be a new feature but before purchase, I didn’t know this was a option and it was pretty much the deciding factor). This is proving very useful to me as I can now use this to assist with my language learning. I have the foreign text in front of me, with the audible narration in that language in my ears, and then I can highlight words to search for definitions and to add to a vocabulary page. Honestly I think language teachers should be recommending this as I have certainly found it very useful.

An e-book is also definitely a space-saver. I bought The Priory of the Orange Tree in the Kindle sale and I’m definitely glad I won’t have to lug around a nearly 1000 page hardback should I wish to re-read.

E-readers also make reading accessible as there are options on my Paperwhite to increase the text size, change the font, even invert the colour which I know would help my brother who is dyslexic. AKA: e-books = books for everyone 😁.

Cost

Quite simply, ignoring the initial expense of the device, e-books are usually cheaper. It’s much cheaper to buy a £3.99 e-book that I may only read once than purchase a physical copy for £7.99 and let it gather dust on my shelves.

Before anyone comes at me to say ‘libraries are free’, I’m aware. However some of us aren’t lucky enough to live in a place where we have a local library. My hometown library has lost so much funding that it is only open 6 days a week from 9.30am – 1pm on 2 days, closing at 4pm on 2 days, and closing at 6pm on 2 days, which means I would not have time to get there after work to use the facilities.

New Approach

Most of all, buying my Kindle has already changed my approach to my book-buying habits despite only owning it for around 6 weeks or so.

I’ve pretty much decided that unless I can see myself reading a book more than once, I’m going to buy the e-book rather than the physical copy. Most books I do re-read so this won’t make a massive impact but I think it’s a good question for me to ask myself when I consider how much I can afford to spend.

For instance, I already know that I’ll be buying every one of Samantha Shannon’s books, but after not enjoying Lauren James’s books to the same level I’m unlikely to purchase physical copies unless I really enjoy them. I’ll definitely buy all of the books in series I’m already committed to reading – because if I’ve decided to continue a series chances are that will be a re-read. However, in the future I’m probably going to read the first of a new series on my Kindle before making that decision.

I can already feel myself being more selective with my book-buying which is great when I currently share a flat so all of my belongings remain in the one room.

So far, so good…

Long story short, my first impressions of my Kindle Paperwhite are really positive – despite all of my initial reservations, and at times outright hatred, towards them for most of the last decade or so of e-reader existence.

At the moment I currently own about 20 e-books, most of which I only paid £0.99 for, and own over 400 physical books which I have no plans to get rid of or cut down on. My Kindle has certainly confirmed my suspicion that I will NEVER completely switch to e-books because paper books have my heart and are clearly far superior.

However, I think I may just be a Kindle convert…