Review: Wing Jones by Katherine Webber


Title: Wing Jones

Author: Katherine Webber

Pages: 378

Published: 5th January 2017

⭐️ 4 / 5

Wing Jones is Katherine Webber’s debut novel and one of the strongest debut’s I have read in a very long time.  After meeting Katherine at Samantha Shannon’s book launch in Edinburgh early last 2017 and chatting about her book, I just had to read it.  This review is two years overdue…

Wing Jones is a contemporary YA which is not usually something I would go for unless John Green has written it.  High school (I call it secondary school like the majority of the UK do) wasn’t a fun time for me so I try to avoid reliving it through fictional characters either dealing with what I did, or getting to enjoy the stuff I expected of high school that didn’t happen.  However, I loved this book which was a pleasant surprise.

Read More

Review: The Loneliest Girl in the Universe by Lauren James

Title: The Loneliest Girl in the Universe

Author: Lauren James

Pages: 290

Published: 7th September 2017

⭐️ 5 / 5

This book was honestly the biggest surprise. It has been sat on my shelf since last July when I bought it at YA Prom (Katherine Webber’s launch party for Only Love Can Break Your Heart), but I haven’t got around to it and I’ve been putting it off for other things. I think it’s because of the sci-fi element. I have an interesting relationship with the genre. I generally enjoy it, but there is a very fine line for me between that enjoyment and content that gives me eye strain from rolling my eyes so hard at either the sheer ridiculousness or predictability of it. I am more likely to DNF a novel of this genre than any other so I think I was apprehensive to start this book. However, as I said, this book was the most pleasant surprise of this year for me. I am seriously impressed.

Read More

Review: Song of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury (Sorrow #2)

Title: Song of Sorrow

Author: Melinda Salisbury

Pages: 370

Published: 7th March 2019

⭐️ 5 / 5

Anyone who has spoken to me over the last year will know just how much I loved State of Sorrow. It was easily my favourite book of 2018 so the sequel, and conclusion to the duopoly, Song of Sorrow is one of my most anticipated reads of this year. State of Sorrow ended on a cliffhanger that meant Sorrow’s struggles weren’t over, they were merely beginning and were sure to spiral out of control.

Read More



Review: Traitor to the Throne by Alwyn Hamilton (Rebel of the Sands #2)

Title: Traitor to the Throne

Author: Alwyn Hamilton

Pages: 592

Published: 2nd February 2017

⭐️ 5 / 5

Although I’ve had the second instalment of Alwyn Hamilton’s series sat on my shelf for quite some time (since October in fact), I’ve only just got around to it now and I’d completely forgotten how much I love this series!  The press tour for the third and final book in this series is currently filling my twitter feed which gave me the kick I needed to jump back into this world.

Read More

Review: The Scarecrow Queen by Melinda Salisbury (Sin Eater’s Daughter #3)

Title: The Scarecrow Queen

Author: Melinda Salisbury

Pages: 336

Published: 2nd March 2017

⭐️ 4.5 / 5

I’m more than a little obsessed with this series at this point.  I honestly don’t know how I was so late to the party in reading this.

The Scarecrow Queen is the third and final instalment of Melinda Salisbury’s series The Sin Eater’s Daughter.  If you’ve read my reviews for books one and two you’ll know I’m a bit of a fan.  I panicked a little bit when I flicked through this book because my pet peeve is switching POVs every few chapters and I could feel it coming owing to the fact the previous books left us with two equally important protagonists that both have a voice.  Whilst Melinda did do this and switch POVs between Errin and Twylla I loved the way she did it in much larger chunks rather than ricocheting between the two every chapter, which would have left me reading only out of loyalty to the series and the characters that I needed to know what happened to.  This technique did mean that there was a lot that happened to the protagonist that wasn’t narrating that chunk by the time we got back to them which caused some overlap and some gaps that we had to work hard to fill in ourselves but I don’t feel that impacted the story or my enjoyment of it.  The split narrative worked well because it allowed us to see what was happening on both sides of the revolution as one protagonist remained with the rebellion and one was unfortunately imprisoned so we could see the ramp up to the final battle from different angles which I loved.  The narrative of this book somehow managed to take even darker turns than the previous instalment with the Sleeping Prince, Aurek, employing some really disturbing methods of torture and war tactics.  As horrific as his character is, I really enjoyed it and love that Melinda is not afraid to make her ‘bad guy’ truly disgusting and dark and twisted.  There’s nothing better than an antagonist who you can hate with all of your heart.

Read More