Review: The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

Title: The Sin Eater’s Daughter

Author: Melinda Salisbury

Pages: 333

Published: 5th February 2016

⭐️ 4 / 5

Here we have yet another book I read after meeting the author first. Melinda Salisbury was on the panel at the Fantasy and Folklore event, chaired by Samantha Shannon, at Waterstones Piccadilly. Melinda’s personality screamed through everything she said. She was hilarious, intelligent, the anecdotes of her Grandmother reminded me of my own family…and this concoction meant I simply couldn’t leave without buying one of her books. Surely a person that was so very interesting upon first hearing from her could whip up a book that I would love? Well, bless my instincts because holy smokes what a novel!

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Review: Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton (Rebel of the Sands #1)

So last week’s tube read was *drumroll*

Title: Rebel of the Sands

Author: Alwyn Hamilton

Pages: 358

Published: 4th February 2016

⭐️ 4 / 5

Here’s another book I bought and read off the back of an event I attended at Waterstones Piccadilly. Alwyn was a really engaging panel chair and I loved the snippets I heard about her books so I thought I’d give this one a go.

First things first, DEBUT NOVEL ALERT. Yes, I’m new to the party as this was published in 2016 but let me have my moment. Rebel of the Sands doesn’t feel like a debut. It’s certainly a solid first novel. It took a little bit of warming up to but I’m now converted.

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Review: The Graces by Laure Eve

This week’s train read/commute book has really stollen my heart…

In the week of my one year anniversary of moving to London it was so lovely to wrap myself up in a book that reminded me of my roots, even the slightly odd and alternative ones 😉

Title: The Graces

Author: Laure Eve

Pages: 415

Published: 1st September 2016

⭐️ 5 / 5

This is another novel I decided to read after attending Victoria Aveyard’s event at Waterstones Piccadilly (read about it here). Laure Eve was one of the authors that appeared alongside Victoria, and the more she talked about her own book the more I realised just how much it was up my street. I was NOT disappointed!!

The Graces is about a mysterious family from the small town that the protagonist, River, has just moved to. This simple statement immediately presents some intriguing plot points that drive the book; River is not her real name – we never find out what her real name actually is, only that she feels more comfortable and more herself being known as River. As well as her name being mysterious it’s also unclear where the small town she has just moved to actually is, nor do we know why she has moved there until the final thirty pages or so. The town has a lot of Americanisms in the feel of the high school but it also screams of the kind of small town I grew up in. I’m from Devon and the feel of home is dripping from every page, which makes a lot of sense considering Laure grew up in Cornwall. As much as both sides of the border hate to admit we are certainly very similar in our intriguing ways, especially when is concerns our mythology and our varied histories.

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Review: King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard (Red Queen #3)

Title: King’s Cage

Author: Victoria Aveyard

Pages: 528

Published: 9th February 2017

⭐️ 5 / 5

Book three follows Mare, the Scarlet Guard and the red rebellion, and the silver court. Mare struggles without her power and battles grief whilst alone in a cell. Maven struggles with his power and battles his own grief whilst alone on the throne. Cal struggles amongst changing powers and battles grief whilst alone in a sea of red soldiers. To put it simply, our three mains are balancing angst with being badass.

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Review: Glass Sword by Victoria Aveyard (Red Queen #2)

Title: Glass Sword

Author: Victoria Aveyard

Pages: 440

Published: 9th February 2016

⭐️ 4 / 5

Glass Sword begins where Red Queen ends with our favourite characters (mostly) speeding off into unchartered territory – in some instances, literally. My favourite part of this novel is the vast amount of world building Victoria has included. This second instalment sees Mare travel into the Lakelands, the Northern Territory of the world we are becoming accustomed to. We also discover much more about Norta which builds on what we’ve already discovered in Red Queen. The underground workings of Mare’s world and the mysterious Scarlet Guard are unravelled further and further as the novel goes on.

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Review: Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard (Red Queen #1)

Title: Red Queen

Author: Victoria Aveyard

Pages: 383

Published: 12th February 2015

⭐️ 4 / 5

On the surface Red Queen is yet another YA novel set in some idea of our future where the world has been overrun by some kind of awful regime. We know the drill, right? Wrong. This book was a game changer for me in the way I think of ‘revolutionary YA fiction.’ Unlike novels such as The Hunger Games, Red Queen takes on a different view. The protagonist does not lead some kind of peasant uprising – she is thrust into the limelight straight into the key family, who figurehead the corrupt establishment and oppressive regime, and is betrothed to one of the Princes. Mare becomes the face of all the bad the regime stands for and must play out her part in the revolution completely under the radar, with her own kind hating her for her seeming betrayal. I absolutely loved it.

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Review: Ink by Alice Broadway

*CLAXON* I’m back in the swing of a reading schedule and I’ve actually finished a book! I’ve finally clawed my way out of the reading slump that uni caused and I’m ready to jump back to it.

So…

This week my commute book has been Ink by Alice Broadway. I picked this up last week after hearing Alice talk about her book at Victoria Aveyard’s event at Waterstones Piccadilly (which you can read more about here).

Title: Ink

Author: Alice Broadway (DEBUT NOVEL ALERT)

Pages: 366

Published: 2nd February 2017

⭐️ 4 / 5

First of all can we just loOK HOW PRETTYYY

I know we don’t judge books by their covers but come on. This is a thing of beauty right there. Looks glorious on your bookshelf, glorious whilst you’re fighting for elbow space on the tube, it’s just so pretty and that makes me happy.

I really liked this book. It was a lovely easy read that I just lapped up and sped through without even noticing the page numbers whizzing by. The book is set in a world where life is recorded through the ink on your skin and the citizens have strict beliefs as to why this must be the case. We join the protagonist, Leora Flint, in the aftermath of her father’s death, which has left her reeling. Through mourning him and visiting his skin book she discovers that something isn’t quite right, which leaves her questioning her whole life and her beliefs.

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